CRT Contrast/Burn-In Question

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I've read on some sites that CRTs are somewhat susceptible to burn-in and
that always keeping the contrast setting below 50 bars is a good idea. I
have a Philips 34PW8502 which I've set to 49 contrast (heh)... but the
picture is just so DIM. Am I being paranoid, and how likely is burn-in to
occur for a guy who likes his contrast a little higher (say 60-65). I watch
TV in 4:3 when applicable and certain movies in 2:35:1 still have small bars
at the top and bottom. These edges are the places where burn-in is a
concern for me.

Aphelion
 
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Aphelion <sonship@twcny.rr.com> wrote:
} I've read on some sites that CRTs are somewhat susceptible to burn-in and
} that always keeping the contrast setting below 50 bars is a good idea. I
} have a Philips 34PW8502 which I've set to 49 contrast (heh)... but the
} picture is just so DIM. Am I being paranoid, and how likely is burn-in to
} occur for a guy who likes his contrast a little higher (say 60-65). I watch
} TV in 4:3 when applicable and certain movies in 2:35:1 still have small bars
} at the top and bottom. These edges are the places where burn-in is a
} concern for me.

Direct view CRTs like yours don't burn in anywhere near as easy as rear
projection CRTs and Plasmas are even worse.

60-65% contrast should be fine. My 34" set is 2.5 years old. Between
4:3 shows and 2.35:1 movies I watch a lot of things with black bars and
there is no sign of burn in.

--

Frank Ball frankb@sonic.net
 
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Aphelion wrote:

> I've read on some sites that CRTs are somewhat susceptible to burn-in and
> that always keeping the contrast setting below 50 bars is a good idea.

Get a video setup DVD ("Video Essentials", "Avia" etc) and correctly set
all of the video settings. It will improve picture quality and reduce
the risk of uneven phosphor wear.

Matthew
 
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Its kind of wierd, on my set I have 3 or 4 preset settings like "Standard"
"Movie" "Pro""vivid". The dimmer settings do indeed look dim, but after a
few days I might say to myself "hmm, the tv looks brighter today I wonder if
the kids changed the mode" and when I check, the tv is still on a dim
setting (movie). Give yourself a chance to get used to a dim setting and
you might just find that you like it better.

--Dan

"Aphelion" <sonship@twcny.rr.com> wrote in message
news:fSfkd.95499$l07.69593@twister.nyroc.rr.com...
> I've read on some sites that CRTs are somewhat susceptible to burn-in and
> that always keeping the contrast setting below 50 bars is a good idea. I
> have a Philips 34PW8502 which I've set to 49 contrast (heh)... but the
> picture is just so DIM. Am I being paranoid, and how likely is burn-in to
> occur for a guy who likes his contrast a little higher (say 60-65). I
watch
> TV in 4:3 when applicable and certain movies in 2:35:1 still have small
bars
> at the top and bottom. These edges are the places where burn-in is a
> concern for me.
>
> Aphelion
>
>
 
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