Questions about lenses and DSLR settings?

str8bean

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Dec 22, 2015
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Whats up peeps!

I purchased a Canon EOS 70D camera a while ago, but I haven't gotten time to actually learn to use it until now.

It was a combo kit including a lens which is EFS 18-135mm. I'm no guru when it comes to cameras this caliber, and wanted to ask a few "general" questions about it.

My intended uses for this camera are panoramic shots (traveling shots, beaches, buildings, stuff like that), up close still life shots of video games and other objects.

Close up shots like this:


Travel/panoramic shots like this:

I don't know if I'm explaining myself very well but this is what I'm trying to do lol.

As for questions I had:

I'm sure lenses is what plays a major role in the kind of shot and angle you get for a picture. What lens would you guys suggest for up close shots like the gameboy above, and one for panoramic shots? Thats if this included lens is no good lol.

I noticed there's extra settings that have to do with ISO, shutter time and all that stuff. Is there a template of any kind for settings that could be ready for anything? Like picking up the camera and shooting a still picture. (Maybe some with motion too?)

Thanks for your time and reading this, hopefully you guys can help me out a bit!

- Reynaldo
 

anonymousdude

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Jun 20, 2009
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Oh man where to start. The kit lens isn't great. It's flexible and usable, but you won't get the most out of your camera with it. But just because you have a nice camera and lens doesn't mean you'll be a good photographer. Learning the craft is more important than the equipment. Since you're just starting out, stick with the kit lens and just learn how to shoot first. You'll still get good shots with the kit lens.

Close-up or macro shots require a macro lens. Well I shouldn't say require but you'll get the best results from a macro lens. Macro lens can usually focus in really close and have 1:1 magnification. Here's a pretty good and simple explanation

http://www.techradar.com/us/how-to/photography-video-capture/cameras/what-is-a-macro-lens-magnification-and-minimum-focus-distance-explained-1320803

For panoramas I like prime or fixed focal length lens because they are good quality and are generally cheaper. You'll also want the lens to be wide angle. Zoom lenses also work, but good quality zoom lenses are very expensive.

As for ISO, shutter, aperture, etc. they control the exposure of the photo i.e if it's too dark or too bright. Read this tutorial for the more in depth explanation of everything.

http://photography.tutsplus.com/tutorials/the-ultimate-beginners-introduction-to-exposure--photo-3028

As for a template there's not really one as it depends on lighting conditions and other factors. I guess the closest thing would be shooting on auto, but that defeats the whole purpose of using a DSLR. There's a whole bunch stuff I didn't even touch on and honestly it's way easier to just read the basics and try it for yourself. Feel free to ask any other questions you might have though.
 

anonymousdude

Distinguished
Jun 20, 2009
152
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18,660
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Oh man where to start. The kit lens isn't great. It's flexible and usable, but you won't get the most out of your camera with it. But just because you have a nice camera and lens doesn't mean you'll be a good photographer. Learning the craft is more important than the equipment. Since you're just starting out, stick with the kit lens and just learn how to shoot first. You'll still get good shots with the kit lens.

Close-up or macro shots require a macro lens. Well I shouldn't say require but you'll get the best results from a macro lens. Macro lens can usually focus in really close and have 1:1 magnification. Here's a pretty good and simple explanation

http://www.techradar.com/us/how-to/photography-video-capture/cameras/what-is-a-macro-lens-magnification-and-minimum-focus-distance-explained-1320803

For panoramas I like prime or fixed focal length lens because they are good quality and are generally cheaper. You'll also want the lens to be wide angle. Zoom lenses also work, but good quality zoom lenses are very expensive.

As for ISO, shutter, aperture, etc. they control the exposure of the photo i.e if it's too dark or too bright. Read this tutorial for the more in depth explanation of everything.

http://photography.tutsplus.com/tutorials/the-ultimate-beginners-introduction-to-exposure--photo-3028

As for a template there's not really one as it depends on lighting conditions and other factors. I guess the closest thing would be shooting on auto, but that defeats the whole purpose of using a DSLR. There's a whole bunch stuff I didn't even touch on and honestly it's way easier to just read the basics and try it for yourself. Feel free to ask any other questions you might have though.
 

Jimesl

Commendable
May 18, 2016
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Time. It takes time, and some effort to understand photography. There are tons of instructional resources on the Internet, and good books as well. I suggest a few things to start with:

- Research and learn about some of the basic concepts common to every camera. Google "the exposure triangle" and you will find dozens of links to sites, and YouTube videos, explaining the relationship between ISO, aperture, and shutter speed. I would start there first, as these are the underpinnings of the primary settings you need to understand to take full advantage of the capabilities of a DSLR like the 70D.

- You must also learn about your camera. Again, Google is your friend, look for YouTube videos dealing with the Canon 70D. To get yourself started, learn how to use the camera's auto modes. Just don't stop there, because you might as well have bought a cheap point-n-shoot if that is all you want to do. I suggest auto so you can get some experience under your belt right away. If you take my first suggestion, you will learn how taking control of the ISO, aperture, and shutter speed will let you make decisions, instead of letting the camera do all the work.

- Practice. After you've learned a bit about the camera, and the basics, practice is what you will benefit from the most.

- Don't expect miracles because you plunked down a few hundred dollars on a camera. It takes time, and patience, to learn how to use that tool.

- More than any other component in any camera system, except for the sensor itself, the lens affects the quality of any image you make. But that said, kit lenses are often surprisingly good. Canon's 18-135 is not really a great lens, but it is a good walk around range. It will be fine for where you are now. If you get into it, you'll figure out on your own what your next lens, or lenses, should be to suit your style.

- Do your homework, learn about your camera and just go out and start shooting.
 

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