Relation between different Processor Technologies and Laptop Heating

MaddyTomsguide

Commendable
Jun 15, 2016
3
0
1,510
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Hi! I want to know the relationship between different Processing Technologies which processors use and the heat they produce. I use Dell Latitude E6410 and when I go to it's BIOS it shows following Technologies which I can turn on and off:

Performance:

    ■ Multi-Core
    ■ Intel Hyperthreading
    ■ Intel SpeedStep
    ■ Intel Turbo Boost

Virtualization:

    ■ Virtualization
    ■ Enable VT for Direct I/O
    ■ Trusted Execution


So I was wondering if someone could fill this list with respective heat increasing effect of any of theses technologies if they have any and add heat to the system hence turning them off would result in low computer temperature.
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
You are not asking the right question. Is your system getting too hot? If yes, what you should be doing is cleaning out the laptop from the inside, make sure fans are not dusty, maybe even clean off the heatsinks and apply new thermal paste. Not trying to disable CPU functions.

Disabling any Virtualization options won't do anything. Disabling the Performance functions will keep the CPU cooler but will also drop your performance.
 

MaddyTomsguide

Commendable
Jun 15, 2016
3
0
1,510
0


If dust is not the problem but the ambient temperature is then until we don't enter good ambient temperature environment we have to trade cpu performance with lowering cpu temperature.

And the information I requested is still good to be known for educational and experimental purposes if not to deal with cpu heat!
 

jaguarskx

Champion
Moderator
Virtualization does not really affect heat output. It basically allows you to run virtual desktops on a single PC / laptop. It basically allows you to run different operating systems at the same time it allows you to switch between them.

Enable VT for Direct I/O basically restricts what hardware each instance of Virtualization can have access to.

Trusted Execution is basically a security feature to run Windows OS and programs in a "trusted environment" that is pretty complex to explain. It basically prevents programs that have not been developed for Trusted Execution to run on a PC. It is a defense against programs trying to capture sensitive data the CPU is currently processing or have been stored in specific areas of the RAM cache in the CPU itself from being transmitted to some unknown 3rd party. This feature is critical for financial institutions and the Dept. of Defense, but not for the average user.


As for the rest... if heat is a problem then disable Intel Turbo Boost because that feature controls the clockspeed of the CPU between the base clockspeed and the maximum turbo boost speed. For example, the base speed of the i5-5200y is 2.2GHz while the max turbo boost speed is 2.7GHz. Disabling Turbo Boost ensures the CPU never exceeds 2.2GHz.

Do not disable SpeedStep, that controls the clockspeed of CPU at the base clockspeed and below. If the CPU is not doing anything intensive, SpeedStep is used to lower the clockspeed; the lowest clockspeed is probably around 800MHz to 1.2GHZ depending on the specific CPU model. Disabling SpeedStep means the i5-5200u will never drop below 2.2GHz.

Don't bother with the other two options.
 
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