Should i connect my guitar directly to an audio interface or through an amp first?

johnmanth

Estimable
Oct 26, 2014
6
0
4,510
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So, i am about to buy an audio interface (probably m audio m track 2x2) and i was wondering should the guitar be directly connected to the interface and then passed through a amp simulator or should i connect my guitar first to the amp and then connect the amp to the interface (so an amp sim would be useless)? Which option provides better quality and versitility?
ty
 

getochkn

Splendid
Moderator
Two totally different ball games. Usually when people recording from an amp/cabinet setup, they place a microphone in front of the speaker and record it that way. An amp, does exactly that, amplifies the signal to power a speaker, so you don't want to put that directly into a sound card or you'll fry it. Some amp's have a "line-out" that you could connect to a sound card, but then you loose half the quality that makes an amp an amp, which is the tubes and the speakers and all that stuff that make the sound what it is. That's what the amp sim's usually try to recreate. the tube warmth, the speakers, the cabinet, the microphone in front of the speaker, where it's places, what kind of microphone. Recording an amp is art unto itself. Unless you're making an album and know you need the sound of a Marhsall Super Lead Model 1959 and actually happen to possess the few of them left in the world, then a amp sim is probably better for your uses.

Also, an amp sim gives you full amp sound in headphones, whereas to mic an amp, requires the amp be turned up and blasting.
 

getochkn

Splendid
Moderator
Two totally different ball games. Usually when people recording from an amp/cabinet setup, they place a microphone in front of the speaker and record it that way. An amp, does exactly that, amplifies the signal to power a speaker, so you don't want to put that directly into a sound card or you'll fry it. Some amp's have a "line-out" that you could connect to a sound card, but then you loose half the quality that makes an amp an amp, which is the tubes and the speakers and all that stuff that make the sound what it is. That's what the amp sim's usually try to recreate. the tube warmth, the speakers, the cabinet, the microphone in front of the speaker, where it's places, what kind of microphone. Recording an amp is art unto itself. Unless you're making an album and know you need the sound of a Marhsall Super Lead Model 1959 and actually happen to possess the few of them left in the world, then a amp sim is probably better for your uses.

Also, an amp sim gives you full amp sound in headphones, whereas to mic an amp, requires the amp be turned up and blasting.
 
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