True 7.1 Gaming headset

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DxNeXtGen

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Hi! I'm currently looking for a true 7.1 surround sound gaming headset, I have already looked into the Razer Tiamat 7.1, and I have decided that I will not be purchasing that, as the quality appears to be somewhat low for me, I've seen examples where after an extended period of time (heavy or light use) the plastic headband will snap.

I have to preference on whether the headset has an integrated microphone or not. My only preference is that the headset has multiple wires to accommodate for a 7.1 sound card (Ex: Asus Xonar Phoebus)
 

ssddx

Glorious
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cant say i know about its quality but the strix has 7.1 http://www.asus.com/Gaming/STRIX_71/overview/ and looks like (dont quote me on it) an adapter which can connect up to your soundcard.

the vast majority of headsets are virtual surround (only 2 drivers). those that are "true" are most often 5.1 not 7.1. i know of a few 5.1 but not any other 7.1 units besides the one above and the one you listed.

one thing to keep in mind is that you will get BETTER sound quality from a good pair of stereo headphones (and applying virtual surround to it with a soundcard if you REALLY need surround sound) instead of getting one of the multi driver units. why? you get better quality drivers for the price. in a $200 headset with 10 drivers they are going to be nowhere near the quality of a similarly (or less) priced headphone with 2 drivers.

 

DxNeXtGen

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Alright, since the hunt for a true 7.1 is proving extremely difficult, can someone list all of the available true 5.1 headsets? (Also if someone knows where I can buy a Psyko Carbon/Krypton Headset, it would be greatly appreciated)
 

sol666

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Apr 22, 2015
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As far as I know there are only 2 true surround 7.1 headsets and 2 true surround 5.1 headset (I am assuming by true 7.1 u are referring to headsets that have independent drivers for each channel). Let me start with 7.1's

1)Razer Tiamat 7.1: great headset with 5 titanium coated drivers per ear cup(40mm,30mm,30mm,20mm,20mm). Reviewers have had extreme mixed thoughts on it ranging from 10/10 to a 1/10 cuz this headset is heavily sound card dependent. Unless u have an awesome sound card in ur rig this headset will be a waste of money. Not only is this headset expensive but the card most users have recommended is the Asus Phoebos soundcard which costs just as much as the headset. the design is great and comfortable and has analog audio jacks for each channel and it can blow ur mind in a game with pinpoint precision when coupled with the right sound card. Now I personally don't think it is worth it because most virtual surround sound headsets can still out perform a true surround sound headset even if an audio algorithm is a poor substitute for independent drivers when it comes to surround sound. As far as bass is concerned I should point out all true surround sound headsets have poor bass...so far! mostly the driver size cannot be larger then 40mm in order to fit all the drivers in .

2) Asus Strix 7.1: 5 Neodymium magnet drivers per cup(40mm,40mm,30mm,30mm,20mm) unlike the tiamat this headset has two 40mm drivers per ear cup. I have my eyes on this one....for several reasons. this is the first headset to attempt using HDMI connector instead of the 3.5mm audio jack or the USB. Unlike the tiamat it comes with an asus sound card build into the volume control box. Because this headset is still being tested for approval in U.S. there is very little information on it's performance. But if it is anything like it's virtual surround predecessor Asus Strix DSP boasting a massive 60mm driver per cup it may be a surprisingly cheap high quality substitute for the tiamat 7.1. Now it is not much to look at. The build looks cheap and squeaky and the ear cups are huge. Most users have complained that it fits on an over the average size head like a clamp and will cause headaches after 30 minutes. The gimmicks on the sound control box are worthless but if u know ur way around the equalizer, a few tweaks will make surround sound as good as any expensive virtual surround headset (according to some users). Now the achilles heal of this headset is the same as tiamat. because the drivers can't be larger then 40mm the high range, low range and bass are pretty much as weak as the tiamat in 2.1 setting and sufficient (not over powering) in 7.1 setup although most users observed the bass is better on this one compared to tiamat. ofc the biggest reason I have my eyes on this one is because it comes with the asus promise of listening to the customer. infact it already has a firmware update available on the asus site for boosting bass and volume.

Now I will be brief about the 5.1's: 1) Cooler master storm sirus 5.1: 3 30mm drivers and 1 40mm for the economical man who likes quality.
2) Roccat Kave 5.1 XTD: 2 40mm and 1 30mm in a dome shaped ear cup for perfect ear to driver
position makes this a great high end 5.1 headset.

now regardless of which true surround sound Headset u go for they all share the same problem. un-impressive bass compared to virtual surround sound headsets. 2 channel audio sounds horrible. however it varies from one headset to another. If u like to listen to music more then games on ur headset then I would suggest going the virtual surround sound headset way....sennheiser PC363d leads the pack on that front. This is all I know the rest is up to u!
 

Urzu1000

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Dec 24, 2013
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Hey guys, I thought I would jump on this thread since I came across it. I've been using a Tiamat 7.1 for two years now, and I feel like I can contribute something to this discussion.

When I first got the headset, I was upgrading from a Logitech G930, and the first thing I noticed was that the Tiamat wasn't as comfortable around the ears. The G930 will squeeze your head like a watermelon until you break in the aircraft grade aluminum, but the Tiamat was much more forgiving. To be clear, you will never snap the plastic on this headset unless you grab each ear cup, and try to rip them apart like the Hulk. It isn't poorly designed, and it doesn't feel cheap. The ear cups are a little smaller though, which is a negative for me.

The sound quality, which is one of the biggest points, is great. For the first year, I simply used my built in 7.1 on my MoBo. It was better then the virtual 7.1 on the Logitech G930, but it was only a minor improvement. The real "advantage" to it was in games. I play a lot of first person shooters, and I rely heavily on audio. In games that provide adequate audio support (such as Battlefield 4), I'm able to hear a footstep behind me, and knew 'precisely' what direction it came from as well as how far away. Definitely a plus. However, for music, this was no better then the Virtual 7.1 of the G930.

The second year that I've had this headset, I bought myself a sound card. I didn't expect a huge different, but wow. I was blown away. When you combine this with a sound card, it blows any virtual 7.1 headset out of the water. The bass was and is the most incredibly precise bass I've ever heard outside of real life. I've heard giant speaker setups with subwoofers the size of a small car, and they are louder, but you can't compare the quality of the sound. It's clear. If you end up with a 7.1 headset and a sound card, I recommend watching a Transformers movie. Especially the last one. And the rest of the audio was incredible as well for music, which was another plus.

The biggest flaw is the mic, which looks like it was tacked on as an after thought. You're better off buying a cheap desktop mic or a clip-on one if you game online with friends, or talk regularly over Skype. The quality is okay, from what my friends have said, but it feels very cheap, and crapped out after a year. The good news, is that it can be slid back into the headset. I suppose it was meant to be a design feature initially, but when it breaks, you can slide it back inside, and pretend the headset doesn't have a mic anymore.

The reason I came across this thread is because I was looking for comparisons between this headset and the Strix 7.1. The Strix is the first real alternative to the Tiamat if you're looking for True 7.1 in a headset, and it looks good. It appears that it has larger ear cups, which is a big deal to me, and the mic should be better (can't really be worse). I can't really imagine the audio being better, but I'm sure it will be excellent. All in all, when this headset finally breaks in a few years, I'm going to try out the Strix. If you're the type who doesn't want to take risks though, avoid all the reviews, and try out a Tiamat. You won't be disappointed.
 

Dhardrian

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