700D still sufficient?

GlenicoNico

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Dec 19, 2013
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I'm gonna keep it short.

My 1100D is getting too old, and I wanna get a new camera. I've got my eye on the 700D and 750D. I was wondering if the 700D is still going to be enough for my needs. I shoot mostly architecture, landscape and portraits every once in a while.

The price of the 700D (body only) is why I'm considering it. The new processor is why I'm considering the 750D (More AF points, all cross-type), it gives me a faster AF.

Video? nah, I hardly ever shoot any.

Which one should I go for? (Yes, value for money is important for me)

Any answer will be appreciated. :)
 

mrmez

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Aug 15, 2006
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Why do you need 24mp?
I've got a 5k monitor and that's only 14mp.
You're already shooting at many more MP than most monitors can display. If you need to crop excessively, you're shooting wrong to begin with.
Buy a new camera for many reasons. Better on-board image processing so you need do less post, more easily accessible custom modes so you don't need to drill into the menu to change between profiles, etc, etc.
Don't buy into the megapixel marketing garbage. If you really want an improvement, get full frame and pro lenses.

AF speed: Canon has marginally faster AF at the cost of more photos will be slightly out of focus. All this is limited by your lens of course. Modern lenses have their own focus servo, so the speed is limited by the lens, not the camera. For anything still, you should be taking your time to carefully compose, focus and shoot.

AF points: Honestly, once you display them in the finder, 11 is plenty. 1 point is all you need for portraits. For studio portraits, once you're focused you should probably disable auto focus anyway. I don't usually look through the camera once focused and framed, I look at my subject and engage them a bit, snapping away. Nothing worse than that dull death stare into the camera.
 

mrmez

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Why do you need more and faster AF for architecture?
Are the buildings moving or just your subjects ;)
Most of that you'f use a single AF point anyway.

Digital cameras go obsolete in a few years anyway, so unless you're a full-time pro, just get whatever really.
Spend your money on glass. Good glass lasts forever.
 

GlenicoNico

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Dec 19, 2013
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Buildings can sometimes move man, you'll never know, gotta be prepared ;)

Anyways, I just want that fast AF and more AF points for portraits.

That's what I'm saying, I've invested on nice glass for the past years, 24-70 f/2.8 ii, 50mm f/1.4, Sigma 35mm f/1.4 ART, you name it, but I feel like the 1100D is kinda "bottlenecking" the glass that I have. I mean...12 megapixels...

So? the 700D I guess? But that 24 megapixels on the 750D might come in handy to crop a little bit....
 

mrmez

Distinguished
Aug 15, 2006
266
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19,010
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Why do you need 24mp?
I've got a 5k monitor and that's only 14mp.
You're already shooting at many more MP than most monitors can display. If you need to crop excessively, you're shooting wrong to begin with.
Buy a new camera for many reasons. Better on-board image processing so you need do less post, more easily accessible custom modes so you don't need to drill into the menu to change between profiles, etc, etc.
Don't buy into the megapixel marketing garbage. If you really want an improvement, get full frame and pro lenses.

AF speed: Canon has marginally faster AF at the cost of more photos will be slightly out of focus. All this is limited by your lens of course. Modern lenses have their own focus servo, so the speed is limited by the lens, not the camera. For anything still, you should be taking your time to carefully compose, focus and shoot.

AF points: Honestly, once you display them in the finder, 11 is plenty. 1 point is all you need for portraits. For studio portraits, once you're focused you should probably disable auto focus anyway. I don't usually look through the camera once focused and framed, I look at my subject and engage them a bit, snapping away. Nothing worse than that dull death stare into the camera.
 

GlenicoNico

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Dec 19, 2013
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Thank you! I was considering going full frame, but then again, I'm not a full-time pro photographer, so I thought there's no need to go full frame.

For the crop, it's just annoying when people get into your shot, you know what I mean? So cropping them out is what I usually do. I never do extreme cropping though, what's the point? Like you said, cropping way too much = bad composition.

And yes, I'm fully aware that megapixel is not the most important thing. :)
 

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