CD digital storage

Jun 13, 2018
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I have an old Nikko amplifier, a Technics turntable, Yamaha speakers, and a CD changer. The changer no,longer works. Thinking of digitizing my CD collection to FLAC files. Not sure if this is the best route, and how to do it.
Advice appreciated
 
I have done a lot of CD rips. Once you are set up it usually takes 4-7 minutes each.
You want 16 bit 44.1 flac files so the quality will be equal to the CD. I like to use either EZ CD Audio Converter or DB Poweramp software but the files will come out them same with whatever you use. I am not anal enough to use Exact Audio Copy which can take longer. Tagging the files the way you like may add some time but doesn't have to be done while you are ripping.
For playback you can use
1. A computer running Windows or iOS and using playback software like MediaMonkey, JRiver Media Center, or Audirvana on macs.
2. Dedicated audio Server (which is a computer), You can make one with a Rasberry PI running Pi Musicbox or Runeaudio. An old PC running Vortexbox would work too. These have the advantage in having a music only OS. Many people feel that the less background stuff running the better it sounds. There are guides online for how to turn off services in Windows for this reason.
3. A streamer like the Denon HeosLink has a USB port so you can connect a drive directly to it. It supports higher than CD quality files as well. Also streams music services. Controlled by their free app. A Sonos Connect will play the files if they are on your network but a drive can't be connected to it directly. Also limited to CD quality. Easy to set up and both have nice control apps that run on Android and iOS phones and tablets..
4. Oppo BD player can be used as a server. The older ones don't go for much,
 
Use your favorite search engine for tutorials on "CD Ripping". Think about devoting half an hour per CD, at least, to get the best out of this process.

You will also need a media player which can play FLAC files, and a file storage (computer, NAS box, etc) where to store your music. Plan about 200MB per CD, at least.
 
I have done a lot of CD rips. Once you are set up it usually takes 4-7 minutes each.
You want 16 bit 44.1 flac files so the quality will be equal to the CD. I like to use either EZ CD Audio Converter or DB Poweramp software but the files will come out them same with whatever you use. I am not anal enough to use Exact Audio Copy which can take longer. Tagging the files the way you like may add some time but doesn't have to be done while you are ripping.
For playback you can use
1. A computer running Windows or iOS and using playback software like MediaMonkey, JRiver Media Center, or Audirvana on macs.
2. Dedicated audio Server (which is a computer), You can make one with a Rasberry PI running Pi Musicbox or Runeaudio. An old PC running Vortexbox would work too. These have the advantage in having a music only OS. Many people feel that the less background stuff running the better it sounds. There are guides online for how to turn off services in Windows for this reason.
3. A streamer like the Denon HeosLink has a USB port so you can connect a drive directly to it. It supports higher than CD quality files as well. Also streams music services. Controlled by their free app. A Sonos Connect will play the files if they are on your network but a drive can't be connected to it directly. Also limited to CD quality. Easy to set up and both have nice control apps that run on Android and iOS phones and tablets..
4. Oppo BD player can be used as a server. The older ones don't go for much,
 

anort3

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Moderator
I just finished ripping all 457 of my CDs to FLAC a few months ago. They take up 115GB.

I did it for several reasons. I now have a backup ( in several places ) of all those CDs if anything ever happened. Also, I listen on my PC as much as anywhere else so having a high quality file right there is nice now that I have some pretty decent equipment at the computer.

I used Exact Audio Copy.

http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/

And I use the Foobar player on the computer.

https://www.foobar2000.org/

Both are free.

It didn't take a half hour per CD but it wasn't fast. :lol:
 
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