I would like to buy DSLR-camera for filming.

kenrivers

Splendid
Moderator
That camera should be fine. The tripod in that "kit" looks cheap and I suggest purchasing a good tripod. You won't regret it. Investing in a good microphone or audio recorder is a good idea as well. Keep in mind the most important piece of the puzzle is you. Great equipment does not great video make. If you are serious about this then you need to study the techniques and get in a lot of practice. Study the user manual and get to know the camera (regardless of which one you choose).

Links you might be interested in checking out regarding video creation techniques:
http://www.lavideofilmmaker.com/filmmaking/film-techniques.html
https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Filmmaking (free course)
http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/ten-ways-to-improve-your-dslr-filmmaking-skills.html
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/video/buying-guide/basic-equipment-new-filmmaking-students
"How To Shoot Video that Doesn't Suck" Used that book when teaching a middle/high school introductory video production class.
http://www.premiumbeat.com/blog/8-filmmaking-tutorials-every-filmmaker-should-watch/
http://www.ukfilmnet.org/learning/course/category.php?id=2
http://www.slideshare.net/adityarao310/composition-skills-in-film-making
 

BlueFireZ

Estimable
Sep 10, 2014
463
0
5,910
138
Welcome to the world of videography!

Generally, what kind of videos will you be taking (nature, indoor, etc)? I own a 70D with the same kit lens and its a decent camera for video, but awesome for photo. Preferably, I would buy a 80D if possible, or a Sony camera since they are much better for video, also the kit you linked is more edged towards photography, so I recommend looking for a different one.

So if you're going to be filming you're going to need these things; A camera (obviously), a decent lens, a fluid head tripod for those smooth pans and tilts, and some decent lighting equipment.

Lighting: if your taking video outside, don't worry about lighting. If you are indoors you will need as much light as possible so you don't get grain.

Lens: A basic kit lens would do the trick (the one that comes with the camera).

Tripod: There are tons of tripods out there, so its best to be recommended with your budget

Most importantly, the Camera: If you can put in about $50 more this is a much superior camera kit

http://www.amazon.com/Sony-16-50mm-55-210mm-Lens-Beachcamera/dp/B01BLP1QDM/ref=sr_1_7?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1457900901&sr=1-7&keywords=sony+a6300

The Sony will get you 4k at 30fps and 1080 at 60fps.

Hope this Helps!
 

kenrivers

Splendid
Moderator
That camera should be fine. The tripod in that "kit" looks cheap and I suggest purchasing a good tripod. You won't regret it. Investing in a good microphone or audio recorder is a good idea as well. Keep in mind the most important piece of the puzzle is you. Great equipment does not great video make. If you are serious about this then you need to study the techniques and get in a lot of practice. Study the user manual and get to know the camera (regardless of which one you choose).

Links you might be interested in checking out regarding video creation techniques:
http://www.lavideofilmmaker.com/filmmaking/film-techniques.html
https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Filmmaking (free course)
http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/ten-ways-to-improve-your-dslr-filmmaking-skills.html
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/video/buying-guide/basic-equipment-new-filmmaking-students
"How To Shoot Video that Doesn't Suck" Used that book when teaching a middle/high school introductory video production class.
http://www.premiumbeat.com/blog/8-filmmaking-tutorials-every-filmmaker-should-watch/
http://www.ukfilmnet.org/learning/course/category.php?id=2
http://www.slideshare.net/adityarao310/composition-skills-in-film-making
 

basroil

Honorable


If you're starting from zero, I highly recommend using a camcorder first. I know that fancy things like depth of field get all the press, but it actually will hinder your learning! Go simple, learn things like framing and scene composition, move on to setting the tone, throw in some color theory, and only then start concerning yourself with things like depth of field and image quality. A camcorder will let you try out all the major things you need to learn without holding you back (with things like a 15-30min recording limit, noisy focus, etc). Something like the Canon HF 600 would be a good start, and you can spend the rest on a decent tripod and a larger budget for actually doing something (transportation, hire a student actor, etc).
 
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