Sony Repair Suggestions

peter

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Sony Factory Service refused to repair my 1991 top-of-the-line CDP-X777ES CD
player because they claim they have no parts anymore, this despite the fact
that over the phone they had assured me that they did indeed have parts for
the CD Player and based on that I had sent it to their San Diego,
California, Service Center. The problem is that the CD Player refuses to
recognize a few new CDs that are playable on all other CD Players. It plays
about 300 other CDs without any problems.

Hence I am wondering if anyone might know of a very "reputable" and
"reliable" repair service that would be willing to help me? I do not care
where it might be within the USA.

Thanks in advance for your possible recommendations.
 
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"Peter" <p_ullman@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:Tjmic.9711$e4.5102@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> Sony Factory Service refused to repair my 1991 top-of-the-line CDP-X777ES
CD
> player because they claim they have no parts anymore, this despite the
fact
> that over the phone they had assured me that they did indeed have parts
for
> the CD Player and based on that I had sent it to their San Diego,
> California, Service Center. The problem is that the CD Player refuses to
> recognize a few new CDs that are playable on all other CD Players. It
plays
> about 300 other CDs without any problems.
>
> Hence I am wondering if anyone might know of a very "reputable" and
> "reliable" repair service that would be willing to help me? I do not care
> where it might be within the USA.
>
> Thanks in advance for your possible recommendations.
>
Did they tell you what part needed to be replaced, that they no longer have?
If there diagnosis is correct, then you should try to determine whether you
can find the part, either new or from a salvaged player. Keep in mind that
if a repair service does not have the part in stock, they order from Sony
unless it is generic component.
 
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Mark A wrote:
>>
> Did they tell you what part needed to be replaced, that they no
> longer have? If there diagnosis is correct, then you should try to
> determine whether you can find the part, either new or from a
> salvaged player. Keep in mind that if a repair service does not have
> the part in stock, they order from Sony unless it is generic
> component.

Clean the lens, or have the laser replaced. Any competent service person
shoulsd be able to do it. You'll need to be able to find the laser part
number though.

My guess is that you were talking to somebody non-technical, who was put on
the spot and decided to take the easy way 'out'.

geoff
 
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"Geoff Wood" <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote in message
news:N0oic.3524$cY5.269493@news02.tsnz.net...
> Mark A wrote:
> >>
> > Did they tell you what part needed to be replaced, that they no
> > longer have? If there diagnosis is correct, then you should try to
> > determine whether you can find the part, either new or from a
> > salvaged player. Keep in mind that if a repair service does not have
> > the part in stock, they order from Sony unless it is generic
> > component.
>
> Clean the lens, or have the laser replaced. Any competent service person
> shoulsd be able to do it. You'll need to be able to find the laser part
> number though.
>
> My guess is that you were talking to somebody non-technical, who was put
on
> the spot and decided to take the easy way 'out'.
>
> geoff
>
Keep in mind that most manufacturers like Sony have flat rate pricing for
repair of items out of warranty, regardless of what is wrong with it.
Sometimes they will you send you a refurbished item in exchange.

I believe that he was quoted $216 for the repair. At those prices, they
replace parts, and don't just clean them.

But for less than $300, one could probably purchase a new one with much
better electronics, especially the D/A conversion circuits. Also a new one
would play CD-R's, which I doubt the old one does.
 
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For the amount of money it would cost to have the darn thing packed and
shipped from Mail Boxes, Etc., you could buy a new one.

randy

"Peter" <p_ullman@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:Tjmic.9711$e4.5102@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> Sony Factory Service refused to repair my 1991 top-of-the-line CDP-X777ES
CD
> player because they claim they have no parts anymore, this despite the
fact
> that over the phone they had assured me that they did indeed have parts
for
> the CD Player and based on that I had sent it to their San Diego,
> California, Service Center. The problem is that the CD Player refuses to
> recognize a few new CDs that are playable on all other CD Players. It
plays
> about 300 other CDs without any problems.
>
> Hence I am wondering if anyone might know of a very "reputable" and
> "reliable" repair service that would be willing to help me? I do not care
> where it might be within the USA.
>
> Thanks in advance for your possible recommendations.
>
>
>
 
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In article <Tjmic.9711$e4.5102@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net>,
Peter <p_ullman@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
>Sony Factory Service refused to repair my 1991 top-of-the-line CDP-X777ES CD
>player because they claim they have no parts anymore, this despite the fact
>that over the phone they had assured me that they did indeed have parts for
>the CD Player and based on that I had sent it to their San Diego,
>California, Service Center. The problem is that the CD Player refuses to
>recognize a few new CDs that are playable on all other CD Players. It plays
>about 300 other CDs without any problems.

Sony is that way.

>Hence I am wondering if anyone might know of a very "reputable" and
>"reliable" repair service that would be willing to help me? I do not care
>where it might be within the USA.

Take it to your local TV repair shop and ask for a cleaning and lubrication
job. If it hasn't been done for a couple of years, you'll find that fixes
a lot of your problems.

If the problem is actually that it does not play copy-protected CDs, your
only recourse is to take them back to the store and demand a refund. Those
will not play on a large number of older machines and quite a few newer ones
too.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
 
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Geoff Wood <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote:
>
>My guess is that you were talking to somebody non-technical, who was put on
>the spot and decided to take the easy way 'out'.

Is there someone technical at Sony service? If so, I've never met them.
Certainly the guys doing the actual work don't seem to know anything beyond
swapping boards until the problem goes away.
--scot
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
 
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Lazarus <manof@manynames.com> wrote:
>
>At this location on the PCB you will see one or two small screws which are
>variable resistors.....turn them until your current discs play
>
>But be warned you may now have problems with your older discs!

No. This is a very bad idea.
There is an actual procedure in the service manual for doing an alignment.
It's not all that hard, and all you need is a reference disc and a scope.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
 
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On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 21:47:47 -0700, Peter wrote
(in message <Tjmic.9711$e4.5102@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net>):

> Sony Factory Service refused to repair my 1991 top-of-the-line CDP-X777ES CD
> player because they claim they have no parts anymore...
>--------------------------------snip----------------------------------<

A friend of mine told me this week he heard that Sony is going to let
something like a million bucks' worth of parts in their inventory go out of
stock, mainly for tax reasons and other related problems.

As far as your player goes, it is true that getting anything fixed over 7
years old is a problem -- since legally, the manufacturer only has to carry
parts for 7 years after a model has been discontinued.

The 777 had a helluva good transport for its time, and the higher-end ES
players are built like tanks. I'd hunt around until you can find a good
independent service shop who's willing to at least check the laser alignment.
It may only need a cleaning, a lube job, and a small bit of alignment to be
good as new.

--MFW
 
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> A friend of mine told me this week he heard that Sony is going
> to let something like a million bucks' worth of parts in their
> inventory go out of stock, mainly for tax reasons and other
> related problems.

If so, this is a break with Sony's policy. I had been told by the head of their
parts division that they never threw out parts.
 
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Seven years is not required now, if it ever really was. They are only
required to support the product for the duration of the warranty period, and
this can include just replacing the product with a refurb or "equivalent"
model.

Mark Z.

--
Please reply only to Group. I regret this is necessary. Viruses and spam
have rendered my regular e-mail address useless.


"Marc Wielage" <mfw@musictrax.com> wrote in message
news:0001HW.BCB0677B0064F903F05095B0@news-server.socal.rr.com...
> On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 21:47:47 -0700, Peter wrote
> (in message <Tjmic.9711$e4.5102@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net>):
>
> > Sony Factory Service refused to repair my 1991 top-of-the-line
CDP-X777ES CD
> > player because they claim they have no parts anymore...
> >--------------------------------snip----------------------------------<
>
> A friend of mine told me this week he heard that Sony is going to let
> something like a million bucks' worth of parts in their inventory go out
of
> stock, mainly for tax reasons and other related problems.
>
> As far as your player goes, it is true that getting anything fixed over 7
> years old is a problem -- since legally, the manufacturer only has to
carry
> parts for 7 years after a model has been discontinued.
>
> The 777 had a helluva good transport for its time, and the higher-end ES
> players are built like tanks. I'd hunt around until you can find a good
> independent service shop who's willing to at least check the laser
alignment.
> It may only need a cleaning, a lube job, and a small bit of alignment to
be
> good as new.
>
> --MFW
>
 
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> Seven years is not required now, if it ever really was.
> They are only required to support the product for the
> duration of the warranty period, and this can include
> just replacing the product with a refurb or "equivalent"
> model.

NOT SO.

A few years back, manufacturers were legally obliged to stock electrical parts
for 10 years, mechanical for 7, and cosmetic for 5 (or was it 3). What the law
currently is, I don't know.
 
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"William Sommerwerck" <williams@nwlink.com> wrote in message
news:108ncs7mjir0ha7@corp.supernews.com...
> > Seven years is not required now, if it ever really was.
> > They are only required to support the product for the
> > duration of the warranty period, and this can include
> > just replacing the product with a refurb or "equivalent"
> > model.
>
> NOT SO.
>
> A few years back, manufacturers were legally obliged to stock electrical
parts
> for 10 years, mechanical for 7, and cosmetic for 5 (or was it 3). What the
law
> currently is, I don't know.
>
What jurisdiction is that? Is that federal, state (which state)? What if a
company goes out of business? Do you have a reference?
 
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>> A few years back, manufacturers were legally obliged to stock
>> electrical parts for 10 years, mechanical for 7, and cosmetic
>> for 5 (or was it 3?). What the law currently is, I don't know.

> What jurisdiction is that? Is that federal, state (which state)?

Federal.


> What if a company goes out of business?

There would be no entity the law could be enforced against.


> Do you have a reference?

No, but the head of Sony parts confirmed this seven or eight years ago.
 
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"William Sommerwerck" <williams@nwlink.com> wrote in message
news:108nib2b85ngk51@corp.supernews.com...
> >> A few years back, manufacturers were legally obliged to stock
> >> electrical parts for 10 years, mechanical for 7, and cosmetic
> >> for 5 (or was it 3?). What the law currently is, I don't know.
>
> > What jurisdiction is that? Is that federal, state (which state)?
>
> Federal.
>
>
> > What if a company goes out of business?
>
> There would be no entity the law could be enforced against.
>
>
> > Do you have a reference?
>
> No, but the head of Sony parts confirmed this seven or eight years ago.

Are you sure he wasn't talking about company policy? I have never heard of
such a thing, unless it is during the warranty period. What kind of products
does this cover?
 
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>>> Do you have a reference?

>> No, but the head of Sony parts confirmed this seven or eight years ago.

> Are you sure he wasn't talking about company policy? I have never
> heard of such a thing, unless it is during the warranty period. What
> kinds of products does this cover?

AFAIK, it's the law. It covers just about everything. Manufacturers are not
allowed to immediately "abandon" discontinued products.

Some years ago Sony told me they would not repair items more than ten years
after their official discontinuance, even if they had the parts. I wouldn't be
surprised if that interval were now down to seven, or even five years.

Sony is like most Japanese companies doing business in the US. They aren't much
interested in long-term customer satisfaction, especially when it comes to
supplying reasonably priced service parts.

If you like, I'll ask the "parts honcha" at Sony exactly what current policy is.
 
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"William Sommerwerck" <williams@nwlink.com> wrote in message
news:108nmk8ccd11j50@corp.supernews.com...
> >>> Do you have a reference?
>
> >> No, but the head of Sony parts confirmed this seven or eight years ago.
>
> > Are you sure he wasn't talking about company policy? I have never
> > heard of such a thing, unless it is during the warranty period. What
> > kinds of products does this cover?
>
> AFAIK, it's the law. It covers just about everything. Manufacturers are
not
> allowed to immediately "abandon" discontinued products.
>
> Some years ago Sony told me they would not repair items more than ten
years
> after their official discontinuance, even if they had the parts. I
wouldn't be
> surprised if that interval were now down to seven, or even five years.
>
> Sony is like most Japanese companies doing business in the US. They aren't
much
> interested in long-term customer satisfaction, especially when it comes to
> supplying reasonably priced service parts.
>
> If you like, I'll ask the "parts honcha" at Sony exactly what current
policy is.
>
I searched the FTC site. which regulates warranties in the USA. I did not
find anything about stocking parts. I would bet you big money that what you
think is a law, is really just Sony internal policy.

Actually, manufacturers are not required by law to stock any parts so long
as they honor the warranty. They have the right to just send you a new or
factory refurbed unit instead of replacing a bad part. Manufacturers are not
required to perform any repairs or parts past the warranty period.

I am not sure why you think Sony is not interested in long term customer
satisfaction. Generally Japanese firms are much more interested in customer
satisfaction than US firms, because for one reason, there is much less
emphasis on quarterly earnings in Japan.

I recently got a quote from Sony for repairing a computer monitor that is 7
years old. Like all their non-warranty repairs, they charge a flat fee
regardless of the problem. I decided not to do it because of the 2-way
shipping charges for the 75 lb monitor were fairly high and I didn't have
the original shipping box.
 
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> I searched the FTC site. which regulates warranties in the USA.
> I did not find anything about stocking parts. I would bet you big
> money that what you think is a law, is really just Sony internal policy.

This has nothing to do with warranties. I've seen it, but it was years ago, and
I don't remember where.


> Actually, manufacturers are not required by law to stock any parts
> so long as they honor the warranty. They have the right to just send
> you a new or factory refurbed unit instead of replacing a bad part.
> Manufacturers are not required to perform any repairs or parts past
> the warranty period.

To the best of my knowledge, none of this is so.


> I am not sure why you think Sony is not interested in long term customer
> satisfaction.

When the replacement cable for a $100 pair of headphones costs $60, you KNOW
they are not interested in long-term customer satisfaction.


> Generally Japanese firms are much more interested in customer
> satisfaction than US firms, because for one reason, there is much
> less emphasis on quarterly earnings in Japan.

This seems to be true in Japan, but not in the US. I can't think of any Japanese
electronics firm that provides really good customer service to its US customers.


I'm going to ask Bonnie. I'll let everyone know sometime next week.
 
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On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 05:49:14 -0700, "William Sommerwerck"
<williams@nwlink.com> wrote:

>> Seven years is not required now, if it ever really was.
>> They are only required to support the product for the
>> duration of the warranty period, and this can include
>> just replacing the product with a refurb or "equivalent"
>> model.
>
>NOT SO.
>
>A few years back, manufacturers were legally obliged to stock electrical parts
>for 10 years, mechanical for 7, and cosmetic for 5 (or was it 3). What the law
>currently is, I don't know.

Where does this law apply? I doubt it's a matter for international
law :)
 
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>> A few years back, manufacturers were legally obliged to
>> stock electrical parts for 10 years, mechanical for 7, and
>> cosmetic for 5 (or was it 3). What the law currently is,
>> I don't know.

> Where does this law apply? I doubt it's a matter for international law :)

WITHIN THE UNITED STATES. Where ELSE would I be talking about? Good grief.
 

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