Laptop keyboards break

AmyRoses

Prominent
Feb 16, 2017
1
0
510
0
Hey.

My laptop is an ASUS X5DIJ.

I've had my laptop for many, many years now. I'm not sure of the exact number, but I've had it for the very least 6 years, probably more like 7. About 3 or 4 years ago my keyboard started to die, as in, some keys were physically breaking off, and parts were lost to them. After that, some random keys stopped working, and I started having to use an external keyboard.

Last year, I purchased a replacement keyboard for my laptop, and installed it. It was successful, and all of the keys worked. However, after less than a month, that new keyboard started having a similar fault.

Keys that don't work: 3, 6, 7, 8, E, T, Y, U, I, O, P, H, J, K, N, Comma, Windows Key, Tab, Left CTRL, Right CTRL, Numpad *, Numpad 8, Numpad 2, Numpad Enter, Page Down, Left Arrow Key, spacebar, a bunch of F(X) keys, and probably more..


Is there any way I can diagnose/fix this? Thanks.
 

CircuitDaemon

Commendable
Feb 23, 2016
29
0
1,610
15
Usually laptop keyboards just die and there's no point in trying to fix them as there's no real circuitry inside, it's just a path from each key combination into the flex cable that plugs into the motherboard. Since these paths are not actual copper or wire but made with conductive paint instead, they tend to wear off with any kind of moisture. Usually replacements aren't as good as the original part, so possible yours was just a cheap copy which didn't have the same quality control. The only way to make sure it's not a software related issue, would be to boot into DOS (create a freeDOS usb drive or something like that) or try sections of the BIOS where you can type or somehow use those keys. It's most likely the keyboard itself. But if it's as old as you say, I wouldn't fix it.
 

CircuitDaemon

Commendable
Feb 23, 2016
29
0
1,610
15
Usually laptop keyboards just die and there's no point in trying to fix them as there's no real circuitry inside, it's just a path from each key combination into the flex cable that plugs into the motherboard. Since these paths are not actual copper or wire but made with conductive paint instead, they tend to wear off with any kind of moisture. Usually replacements aren't as good as the original part, so possible yours was just a cheap copy which didn't have the same quality control. The only way to make sure it's not a software related issue, would be to boot into DOS (create a freeDOS usb drive or something like that) or try sections of the BIOS where you can type or somehow use those keys. It's most likely the keyboard itself. But if it's as old as you say, I wouldn't fix it.
 
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