New Routers with built in protection for IoT devices and more

TonyGamer_49

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Jan 28, 2011
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This year seems to be the year that protection of IoT devices and adding it to a router, with more security features is on the minds of a few companies.
I am very security oriented.
Right now I have a Cujo, and I think it will be replaced by one of the new routers coming out, or possibly added to it, if that is a possibility.
I am very curious if you have had any kind of interaction with the new devices that will be coming out and what your thoughts are about them, there strengths and weaknesses. Many of them are offering savings for pre orders.

I know of 3 such devices. There is the Bitdefender box, which in the past has not really done well, but it will now be a router. Then we have the Norton Core, which will be a first for Norton as far as I know, and we have F Secures Sense router, which has been pushed back several times from the date it was supposed to be released, and is now suppose to be released in the summer of 2017.
None of the companies really give us any information to make any kind of informed decision on there products. Seems many are pushing the parental control, but as for someone who doesn't have any kids, this is a feature I could careless about and even if I did have kids, I think that they are probably many other kinds of free or paid for family filters our there that are very good. I am really looking to get the best security I can in this world, that is becoming less and less secure each day.
 
These are Intrusion Protection Systems designed for the masses to protect them from the other devices designed for the masses.
It is bassically anti virus definations for your router. This also comes at a cost of speed as your router has to analyze each packet before it forwards it on.

You cant access a device on your home network unless an active session is kept open, if completely unsoliscited traffic hits any normal router it ignores it
Your wifi stereo receiver or TV, or Roku box cant be hacked at random because it is not keeping an active connection to a server on the internet.
IoT devices are so vulnerable because in order to make it simple for the masses they have the devices maintain constant communication to the OEMs server and thus provides an open "socket" on the router to communicate with that device. Thus if you can hack into the OEMs server, until a new "definition file" can be sent to the "secure router" then it wont be able to do anything more to stop it.
The senior members on this forum are not going to have camera's that live stream 24x7 to someone elses web server, or a door lock that wont work without an internet connection to the OEMs server because we understand the security vulnurability and want as much control as possible. This is why i choose my specific wifi thermostate because I shouldnt have to connect to a server 1000 miles away to change the temperature on my thermostat 40 ft away.

Out of those three options I would say Norton's product is likely the best and likely to have the best continued support, although being more expensive means it will likely have less sales which could be a motivation problem.
In all reality I would wait off to see if these things are a fad or not because they will only be as good as the defination files they are dependent on and low sales will make this back-burner support at best (just like OEMs providing security updates for the IoT devices this is supposed to protect).
 
These are Intrusion Protection Systems designed for the masses to protect them from the other devices designed for the masses.
It is bassically anti virus definations for your router. This also comes at a cost of speed as your router has to analyze each packet before it forwards it on.

You cant access a device on your home network unless an active session is kept open, if completely unsoliscited traffic hits any normal router it ignores it
Your wifi stereo receiver or TV, or Roku box cant be hacked at random because it is not keeping an active connection to a server on the internet.
IoT devices are so vulnerable because in order to make it simple for the masses they have the devices maintain constant communication to the OEMs server and thus provides an open "socket" on the router to communicate with that device. Thus if you can hack into the OEMs server, until a new "definition file" can be sent to the "secure router" then it wont be able to do anything more to stop it.
The senior members on this forum are not going to have camera's that live stream 24x7 to someone elses web server, or a door lock that wont work without an internet connection to the OEMs server because we understand the security vulnurability and want as much control as possible. This is why i choose my specific wifi thermostate because I shouldnt have to connect to a server 1000 miles away to change the temperature on my thermostat 40 ft away.

Out of those three options I would say Norton's product is likely the best and likely to have the best continued support, although being more expensive means it will likely have less sales which could be a motivation problem.
In all reality I would wait off to see if these things are a fad or not because they will only be as good as the defination files they are dependent on and low sales will make this back-burner support at best (just like OEMs providing security updates for the IoT devices this is supposed to protect).
 

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